LASmoons: Olumese Efeovbokhan

Olumese Efeovbokhan (recipient of three LASmoons)
Geosciences, School of Geography
University of Nottingham, UK

Background:
One of the vital requirements to successfully drive and justify favorable flood risk management policies is the availability of reliable data for hydrological modelling. Unfortunately, this poses a big challenge in data-sparse regions and has resulted in uncoordinated and ineffective flood risk management policies with some areas left at the mercy of the floods they are exposed to. This research is focused on the ability to successfully generate data required for hydrological modelling using affordable and easy-to-replicate methods. The research will utilize unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for the generation of bare earth models (DTMs) from photogrammetry points, which will be subsequently used for flood vulnerability mapping.

Photogrammetry point cloud of Tafawa Balewa Square in Lagos Island, Nigeria

Goal:
Generate a bare earth model using a combination of Agisoft Photoscan and LAStools and then validate its suitability for hydrological modelling. Should the generated model prove to be suitable we will use it to conduct flood sensitivity analysis and inundation modelling in other data-sparse regions using high resolution bare earth models generated the same way.

Data:
+
high-resolution photogrammetry point cloud for a portion of the study area
– – – imagery obtained with an Ebee Sensefly drone flight
– – – photogrammetry point cloud generated with Photoscan by AgiSoft 
+ classified LiDAR point cloud with a resolution of 1 pulse per square meter obtained for the study area from the Lagos State Government

LAStools processing:
1) tile large photogrammetry point cloud into tiles with buffer [lastile]
2) mark set of points whose z coordinate is a certain percentile of that of their neighbors [lasthin]
3) remove isolated low points from the set of marked points [lasnoise]
4) classify marked points into ground and non-ground [lasground]
5) pull in points close above and below the ground [lasheight]
6) create Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from ground points [las2dem]
7) merge and hillshade individual raster DTMs [blast2dem]

LASmoons: Stéphane Henriod

Stéphane Henriod (recipient of three LASmoons)
National Statistical Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

This pilot study is part of the International Climate Initiative project called “Ecosystem based Adaptation to Climate change in the high mountainous regions of Central Asia” that is funded by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMU) of Germany and implemented by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan.

lasmoons_Stephane_Henriod_1

Background:
The ecosystems in high mountainous regions of Central Asia are characterized by a unique diversity of flora and fauna. In addition, they are the foundation of the livelihoods of the local population. Specific benefits include clean water, pasture, forest products, protection against floods and landslides, maintenance of soil fertility, and ecotourism. However, the consequences of climate change such as melting glaciers, changing river runoff regimes, and weather anomalies including sharp temperature fluctuations and non-typical precipitation result in negative impacts on these ecosystems. Coupled with unwise land use, these events damage fragile mountain ecosystems and reduce their regeneration ability undermining the local population’s livelihoods. Therefore, people living in rural areas and directly depending on natural resources must adapt to adverse impacts of climate change. This can be done through a set of measures, known in the world practice as ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) approach. It promotes the sustainable use of natural resources to sustain and enhance the livelihood of the population depending on those resources.

lasmoons_Stephane_Henriod_2 Goal:
In two selected pilot regions of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, planned measures will concentrate on climate-informed management of ecosystems in order to maintain their services for the rural population. EbA always starts with identifying the vulnerability of the local population. Besides analyzing the socio-economic situation of the local population, this includes (1) assessing the ecological conditions of the ecosystems in the watershed and the related ecosystem services people benefit from, (2) identifying potential disaster risks, and (3) analyzing glacier dynamics with its response to water runoff. As a baseline to achieve this and to get spatially explicit, remote sensing based techniques and mapping activities need to be utilized.

A first UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) mission has taken place in the Darjomj watershed of the Bartang valley in July 2016. RGB-NIR images as well as a high-resolution Digital Surface Model have been produced that now need to be segmented and analysed in order to produce comprehensive information. The main processing that will take advantage of LAStools is the generation of a DTM from the DSM that will then be used for identifying risk areas (flood zones, landslides and avalanches, etc.). The results of this approach will ultimately be compared with lower-cost satellite images (RapidEye, Planet, Sentinel).

Data:
+ High-resolution RGB and NIR image (10 cm) from a SenseFly Ebee
+ High-resolution DSM (10 cm) from a SenseFly Ebee

LAStools processing:
1)
classify DSM points obtained via dense-matching photogrammetry into a SenseFly Ebee imagery into ground and non-ground points via processing pipelines as described here and here [lastile, lassort, lasnoise, lasground]
2) create a DTM [las2dem, lasgrid, blast2dem]
3) produce 3D visualisations to facilitate the communication around adaptation to climate change [lasview]
lasmoons_Stephane_Henriod_0