Esri and rapidlasso develop joint LiDAR compressor

PRESS RELEASE (April Fools’ Day)
April 1, 2014
rapidlasso GmbH, Gilching, Germany

In a positive spin of events, Esri and rapidlasso are announcing to join forces and together develop a LiDAR compressor for LAS 1.4 in open source avoiding unnecessary format fragmentation. Their new “LASeasy” tool not only compresses but also optimizes LAS files for efficient area-of-interest queries. LASeasy extends the popular LASzip compressor to handle LAS 1.4 content and includes the tiny spatial indexing *.lax files into the *.laz file via Extended Variable Length Records (EVLRs). More importantly, LASeasy provides new features such as optional spatial sorting and precomputed statistics – motivated by Esri – that allow exploiting LiDAR in the cloud.

To minimize disruption in existing workflows, their joint effort uses a clever strategy that capitalizes on the natural “break” in the ASPRS LAS format from version 1.3 to 1.4. LAS files compressed by Esri will automatically be upgraded to the new point types introduced with LAS 1.4 (and be losslessly downgraded on decompression). LiDAR software already supporting LAZ will instantly be able to read all LiDAR produced by Esri with the same DLL update that will be needed to access future compressed LAS 1.4 content – achieving maximum compatibility with minimal disruption for users of ArcGIS, LASzip, and the larger LiDAR community,

Martin Isenburg, chief scientist and CEO of rapidlasso GmbH, was all smiles during the announement. “Yes, I had some hard feelings when hearing about their ‘LAZ clone‘ because our presumed open dialogue suddenly felt so very one-sided,” he said, “So over Martin Luther King weekend I proposed this LAS 1.4 trick as a joint development quoting MLK’s ‘We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope’ and that seemed to resonate with them.” Speaking on the condition of anonymity an executive of Esri’s management added “For a global geospatial player like us it can happen that we do something ‘evil-by-accident’. We occasionally need someone like Martin to poke some good-natured fun at Esri to remind us of our values.”

LASeasy optimizes LAS files by reordering points along an adaptive space-filling curve for efficient LiDAR queries in the cloud. To access the corner of the LiDAR tile only the points shown in blue need to be loaded and decompressed.

LASeasy optimizes LAS files by reordering points along an adaptive space-filling curve for efficient LiDAR queries in the cloud. To access the corner of the LiDAR tile only the points shown in blue need to be loaded and decompressed.

clone wars and drone fights

NEWSFLASH: update on Feb 5th and 6th and 17th (see end of article)

The year 2014 shapes to be a fun one in which the LiDAR community will see some major laser battles. (-: First, ESRI starts a “lazer clone war” with the open source community saddening your very own LAS clown here at rapidlasso with a proprietary LAZ clone. Then AHAB and Optech start to squirmish over the true penetration depth of their bathymetric systems in various forums. And now RIEGL – just having launched their Q1560 “crossfire” for battling Leica and Optech in the higher skies – is heading into an all-out “laser drone war” with FARO and Velodyne over arming UAVs and gyrocopters with lasers by rolling out their new (leaked?) RIEGL VUX-1 scanner … (-;

Some specs below, but no details yet on power-consumption.

  • about 3.85 kilograms
  • 225mm x 180mm x 125mm
  • survey-grade accuracy of 25mm
  • echo signal digitisation
  • online waveform processing
  • measurement rate up to 500 kHz
  • field of view 300 degrees
  • internal 360 GB SSD storage or real-time data via LAN-TCP/IP
  • collects data at altitudes or ranges of more than 1,000 ft
  • will be on display during ILMF 2014 (Feb 17-19, Denver, USA)
The new RIEGL VUX-1 laser scanner for UAVs ...

The new RIEGL VUX-1 laser scanner for UAVs

Below a proof-of-concept concept video by Phoenix Aerial on how such a system (here based on a Velodyne HDL-32E scanner) may look and operate.

A similar system introduced by Airbotix is shown below.

Aibot X6 with laser scanner from Velodyne HDL-32E

Aibot X6 with laser scanner from Velodyne HDL-32E

But before trusting these kind of drones with your expensive hardware you should make plenty of test flights with heavy payloads. Here a suggestion to make this more fun:

UPDATE (February 5th): It is reported by SPAR Point Group that the RIEGL VUX-1 LiDAR scanner for drones is to be shown at International LiDAR Mapping Forum in Denver later this month. Given the ceremony that the Q1560 “crossfire” was introduced with, it surely seems as if Geospatial World Magazine spilled the news early …

UPDATE (February 6th): RIEGL officially press-released the VUX-1 LiDAR. Its weight is below 4kg and its range up to 1000 ft …

UPDATE (February 17th): Today the new VUX-1 finally made it’s much anticipated world-premiere during ILMF 2014 in Denver. For more images of the official unveiling see RIEGL’s blog.

The VUX-1 LiDAR scanner for UAVs unveiled at ILMF 2014.

The VUX-1 LiDAR scanner for UAVs unveiled at ILMF 2014.

new compressed LAS format by ESRI

NEWSFLASH: update on Jan 7th, 12th, 19th, and Feb 7th (see end of article)

Today I got an email from a LAStools user at NOAA pointing out a new entry in the ArcGIS 10.2 documentation of ESRI that mentions a *.zlas format for the first time. This may have been an oversight at ESRI since there was no press release, blog post, etc preceding this documentation update (that happened 11 days ago). A screenshot of the entry can be found below.

I have heard about LAS compression by ESRI since Gene mentioned it in a blog entry after ESRI’s 3D Mapping and LiDAR Forum. Back then I throught they were talking about LAZ and that our 1.5 years of talking about including support for LASzip-compressed LiDAR into ArcGIS were finally getting somewhere. But turns out they have been doing their own thing. Here some rumors I have heard about ESRI’s new *.zlas format:

  • similar compression rates as LAZ
  • includes spatial indexing
  • (maybe) re-orders points during compression
  • performance is like laszip.exe or better
  • will be available in ArcGIS 10.2.1
  • can be used without the LAS Dataset
  • “free” Windows executable will be available soon
  • development libraries with API will follow
  • ESRI has been giving data providers heads up that clients may soon demand this format

My first thought was that this might be a reengineered version of the LizardTech LiDAR CompressorTM but it is not. This seems to be ESRI’s own development. Does anyone have more details on this?

What was their motivation? Is LAZ too slow for them? I would have happily adressed whatever LASzip was lacking as (compatible) extensions to the LAZ format – which has become de-facto standard for LiDAR compression and is open source. But instead they invested serious money and man-power into creating an entirely new format. Anyone want to speculate why …?

screenshot of ArcGIS 10.2 documentation

screenshot of the ArcGIS 10.2 documentation mentioning *.zlas

UPDATE (January 7th): It is official now. Apparently, Gene who has mentioned our rumors on his blog just received heads up from Clayton Crawford at ESRI that the LAS Optimizer is available for download here. The EzLAS.zip file contains a PDF with interesting details. Below a snapshot of the GUI and what the website says:

“This executable is used to optimize and compress LAS format lidar. It creates *.zlas files, an optimized version of LAS that’s useful for archiving, sharing, and direct use. zLAS files are much smaller and more efficient to use, especially on the cloud and over networks, than regular LAS.
  •  The standalone executable does not require an ArcGIS install or license.
  •  The same executable is used for both compression and decompression.
  •  The download zip file contains more information and help in an included pdf document.”
GUI of the LAS Optimizer

GUI of the LAS Optimizer

Apparently, ArcGIS 10.2.1 is available for general release on January 7th and will support direct read of optimized LAS (*.zlas) via the LAS dataset. Now it’s your turn to try out what ESRI has cooked up and comment … (-:

UPDATE (January 9th): I was told that ESRI will be releasing an “official statement” soon explaining why they have developed their own LiDAR compression format. And they really should do so. I have received (and continue to receive) a fair number of “off-the-record” emails from people across the industry expressing feelings that range between “disappointment”, “anger”, and “disgust” over what is seen as an attempt to sabotage our multi-year effort of creating an open, free, and efficient compressed LiDAR exchange format … time for some xkcd humor.

UPDATE (January 12th): This might just be that “official statement“. Seems someone is really trying hard to avoid using the word LASzip … (-;

UPDATE (January 19th): The story has been picked up by a number of blogs like Paul Ramsey’s “LiDAR format wars“, James Fee’s “LAS, LAZ, LASzip, zLAS and You“, and Randal Hale’s “LiDAR and your software“.

UPDATE (February 7th): The front-lines harden as an unlikely coalition of open source knights, laser guardians, imperial agencies, and competing thugs forms a rebel movement against the approaching Desri Star who threatens the free world announcing that the dArcG is going to spawn “parallelized LAZ clones“. Encrypted instructions to Jedis spread like “Point Clouds on the Horizon” “Towards an Open Future” as the insurgency prepares a better future for compression, free of proprietary oppression. The clone wars might be starting soon. Will the FOSS be with LAZ? (-;