Generating DTM for “fluffy” Livox MID-40 LiDAR via “median ground” points

In the last article about the Livox MID-40 LiDAR scan of Samara we quality checked the data, aligned the flight lines and cleaned the remaining spurious scan lines. In this article we will process this data into the standard products. A focus will be on generating a smooth “median ground” surface from the “fluffy” scanner data. You can get the flight lines here and follow along with the processing after downloading LAStools. Below is one result of this work.

The first processing step will be to tile the strips into tiles that contain fewer points for faster and also parallel processing. One quick “flat terrain” trick first. Often there are spurious points that are far above or below the terrain. For a relatively flat area these can be easily be identified by computing a histogram elevation values with lasinfo and then eliminated with simple drop-filters on the z coordinate.

lasinfo ^
-i Samara\Livox\03_strips_cleaned\*.laz ^
-merged ^
-histo z 1 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\01_quality ^
-o strips_cleaned_merged_info.txt

The relevant excerpts of the output of the lasinfo report are shown below:

[…]
z coordinate histogram with bin size 1.000000
bin -104 has 1
bin 5 has 1

bin 11 has 273762
bin 12 has 1387999
bin 13 has 5598767
bin 14 has 36100225
bin 15 has 53521371
[…]
bin 59 has 60308
bin 60 has 26313
bin 61 has 284
bin 65 has 10
bin 66 has 31
bin 67 has 12
bin 68 has 1
bin 83 has 3
bin 84 has 4
bin 93 has 31
bin 94 has 93
bin 95 has 17

[…]

The few points below 11 meters and above 61 meters in elevation can be considered spurious. In the initial tiling step with lastile we add simple elevation filters to drop those points on-the-fly from the buffered tiles. The importance of buffers when processing LiDAR in tiles is discussed in this article. With lastile we create tiles of size 125 meters with a buffer of 20 meters, while removing the points identified as spurious with the appropriate filters. Because the input strips have their “file source ID” in the LAS header correctly set, we use ‘-apply_file_source_ID’ to set the “point source ID” of every point to this value. This preserves the information of which point comes from which flight line.

lastile ^
-i Samara\Livox\03_strips_cleaned\*.laz ^
-drop_z_below 11 -drop_z_above 61 ^
-apply_file_source_ID ^
-tile_size 125 -buffer 20 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\05_tiles_buffered -o desman.laz

This produces 49 buffered tiles that will now be processed similarly to the workflow outlined for another lower-priced system that generates similarly “fluffy” point clouds on hard surfaces, the Velodyne HLD-32E, described here and here. What do we mean with “fluffy”? We cut out a 1 meter slice across the road with the new ‘-keep_profile’ filter and las2las and inspect it with lasview.

las2las ^
-i Samara\Livox\05_tiles_buffered\desman_331750_1093000.laz ^
-keep_profile 331790 1093071 331799 1093062 1 ^
-o slice.laz

lasview ^
-i slice.laz ^
-color_by_flightline ^
-kamera 0 274.922 43.7695 0.00195313 -0.0247396 1.94022 ^
-point_size 9

In the view below we pressed hot key twice ‘]’ to exaggerate the z scale. The “fuzziness” is that thickness of the point cloud in the middle of this flat tar road. It is around 20 to 25 centimeters and is equally evident in both flight lines. What is the correct ground surface through this 20 to 25 centimeter “thick” road? We will compute a “mean ground” that roughly falls into the middle of this “fluffy” surface,

slice of 1 meter width across the tar road in front of Omael store

The next three lasthin runs mark a sub set of low candidate points for our lasground filtering. In every 25 cm by 25 cm, every 33 cm by 33 cm and every 50 cm by 50 cm area we reclassify the point closest to the 10th percentile as class 8. In the first call to lasthin we put all other points into class 1.

lasthin ^
-i Samara\Livox\05_tiles_buffered\desman_*.laz ^
-set_classification 1 ^
-step 0.25 -percentile 10 20 -classify_as 8 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\06_tiles_thinned_01 -olaz ^
-cores 4


lasthin ^
-i Samara\Livox\06_tiles_thinned_01\desman_*.laz ^
-step 0.3333 -percentile 10 20 -classify_as 8 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\06_tiles_thinned_02 -olaz ^
-cores 4


lasthin ^
-i Samara\Livox\06_tiles_thinned_02\desman_*.laz ^
-step 0.5 -percentile 10 20 -classify_as 8 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\06_tiles_thinned_03 -olaz ^
-cores 4

Below you can see the resulting points of the 10th percentile classified as class 8 in red.

Operating only on the points classified as 8 (i.e. ignoring those classified as 1) we then run a ground classification with lasground using the following command line, which creates a “low ground” classification. .

lasground ^
-i Samara\Livox\06_tiles_thinned_03\desman_*.laz ^
-ignore_class 1 ^
-town -ultra_fine ^
-ground_class 2 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_low -olaz ^
-cores 4

Since this is an open road this classifies most of the red points as ground points.

Using lasheight we then create a “thick ground” by pulling all those points into the ground surface that are between 5 centimeter below and 17 centimeter above the “low ground”. For visualization purposes we temporarily use class 6 to capture this thickened ground.

lasheight ^
-i Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_low\desman_*.laz ^
-classify_between -0.05 0.17 6 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_thick -olaz ^
-cores 4

The “thick ground” is shown below in orange.

We go back to lasthin and reclassify in every 50 cm by 50 cm area the point closest to the 50th percentile as class 8. This is what we call the “median ground”.

lasthin ^
-i Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_thick\desman_*.laz ^
-ignore_class 1 ^
-step 0.5 -percentile 50 -classify_as 8 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_median -olaz ^
-cores 4

The final “median ground” points are shown in red below. These are the points we will use to eventually compute the DTM.

We complete the fully automated classification available in LAStools by running lasclassify with the following options. See the README file for what these options mean. Note that we move the “thick ground” from the temporary class 6 to the proper class 2. The “median ground” continues to be in class 8.

lasclassify ^
-i Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_median\desman_*.laz ^
-change_classification_from_to 6 2
^
-rugged 0.3 -ground_offset 1.5 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\08_tiles_classified -olaz ^
-cores 4

Before the resulting tiles are published or shared with others we should remove the temporary buffers, which is done with lastile – the same tool that created the buffers.

lastile ^
-i Samara\Livox\08_tiles_classified\desman_*.laz ^
-remove_buffer ^
-odir Samara\Livox\09_tiles_final -olaz ^
-cores 4

And then we can publish the points via a Potree 3D Webportal using laspublish.

laspublish ^
-i Samara\Livox\09_tiles_final\desman_*.laz ^
-elevation ^
-title "Samara Mangroves" ^
-odir Samara\Livox\99_portal -o SamaraMangroves.html -olaz ^
-overwrite

Below a screenshot of the resulting Potree 3D Web portal rendered with Potree Desktop. Inspecting the classification will reveal a number of errors that could be tweaked manually with lasview. How the point colors were generated is not described here but I used Google satellite imagery and mapped it with lascolor to the points. The elevation colors are mapped from 14 meters to 25 meters. The intensity image may help us understand why the black tar road on the left hand side that runs from the “Las Palmeras Condos” to the beach in “Cangrejal” has no samples. It seems the intensity is lower on this side which indicates that the drone may have flown higher here – too high to for the road to reflect enough photons. The yellow view of return type indicates that despite it’s multi-return capability, the Livox MID-40 LiDAR is mostly collecting single returns.

The penetration capability of the Livox MID-40 LiDAR was less good than we had hoped for. Below thick vegetation we have too few points on the ground to give us a good digital terrain model. In the visualization below you can see that below the dense vegetation there are large black areas which are completely void of points.

Now we produce the standard product DTM and DSM at a resolution of 50 cm. Because the total area is not that big we generate temporary tiles in “raster LAZ” with las2dem and merge them into a single GeoTiff with blast2dem.

las2dem ^
-i Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_median\desman_*.laz ^
-keep_class 8 ^
-step 0.5 -use_tile_bb ^
-odir Samara\Livox\10_tiles_dtm_50cm -olaz ^
-cores 4

blast2dem ^
-i Samara\Livox\10_tiles_dtm_50cm*.laz -merged ^
-step 0.5 -hillshade ^
-o Samara\Livox\dtm_50cm.png

blast2dem ^
-i Samara\Livox\10_tiles_dtm_50cm*.laz -merged ^
-step 0.5 ^
-o Samara\Livox\dtm_50cm.tif

lasthin ^
-i Samara\Livox\07_tiles_ground_median\desman_*.laz ^
-step 0.5 -percentile 95 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\11_tiles_highest -olaz ^
-cores 4

las2dem ^
-i Samara\Livox\11_tiles_highest\desman_*.laz ^
-step 0.5 -use_tile_bb ^
-odir Samara\Livox\12_tiles_dsm_50cm -olaz ^
-cores 4

blast2dem ^
-i Samara\Livox\12_tiles_dsm_50cm*.laz -merged ^
-step 0.5 -hillshade ^
-o Samara\Livox\dsm_50cm.png

blast2dem ^
-i Samara\Livox\12_tiles_dsm_50cm*.laz -merged ^
-step 0.5 ^
-o Samara\Livox\dsm_50cm.tif

A big “Thank You!” to Nelson Mattie from LiDAR Latinoamerica for bringing his fancy drone to Samara and to Andre Jalobeanu from Bayesmap for his help in aligning the data. You can download the flight lines here and do the above processing on your own after downloading LAStools.

Strip Aligning of Drone LiDAR flown with Livox MID-40 over destroyed Mangrove

September 11th 2020 seemed like a fitting day to hunt down – with a powerful drone – those who destroy our common good. The latest DJI M300 RTK drone came to visit me in Samara, Guanacaste, Costa Rica and it was carrying the gAirHawk GS-MID40 UAV laser scanning system by Geosun featuring the light-weight Livox Mid 40 LiDAR. The drone is owned and operated by my friends at LiDAR Latinoamerica.

We flew a two-sortie mission covering a destroyed mangrove lagoon that was illegally poisoned, cut-down and filled in with the intention to construct a fancy resort in its place some 25 years ago. For future environmental work I wanted to get a high-resolution baseline scan with detailed topography of the meadow and what now-a-days remains of the mangroves that are part of the adjacent “Rio Lagarto” estuary. Recently the area was illegally treated with herbicides to eliminate the native herbs and the wild flowers and improve grazing conditions for cattle. Detailed topography can show how the heavy rains have washed these illegal substances into the ocean and further prove that the application of agro-chemicals in this meadow causes harm to marine life.

Here you can see a sequence of video about the LiDAR system, the preparations and the survey flights. Shortly after the flight I obtained the LiDAR from Nelson Mattie, the CEO of LiDAR Latinoamerica and ran the usual quality checks with LAStools.

lasinfo ^
-i Samara\Livox\00_raw_laz\*.laz ^
-histo intensity 16 ^
-histo gps_time 10 ^
-histo z 5 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\01_quality -odix _info -otxt ^
-cores 3

lasgrid ^
-i Samara\Livox\00_raw_laz\*.laz ^
-utm 16north ^
-merged ^
-keep_last ^
-step 0.5 ^
-density ^
-false -set_min_max 100 1000 ^
-odir Samara\Livox\01_quality ^
-o density_050cm_100_1000.png

For the density image, lasgrid counts how many last return from all flight lines fall into each 50 cm by 50 cm area, computes the desnity per square meter and maps this number to a color ramp that goes from blue via cyan, yellow and orange to red. The overall density of our survey is in the hundred of laser pulses per square meters with great variations where flight line overlap and at the survey boundary. The start and landing area as well as the place where the first flight ended and the second flight started are the two red spots of maximum density that can easily be picked out.

blue: 100 or fewer laser pulses per square meters, red: 1000 or more laser pulses per square meter

lasoverlap ^
-i Samara\Livox\00_raw_laz\*.laz ^
-utm 16north ^
-merged -faf ^
-step 0.5 ^
-min_diff 0.10 -max_diff 0.25 ^
-elevation -lowest ^
-odir Samara\Livox\01_quality ^
-o overlap_050cm_10cm_25cm.png

For the overlap image lasoverlap counts how many different flight lines overlap each 50 cm by 50 cm area and maps the counter to a color: 1 = blue, 2 = cyan, 3 = yellow, 4 = orange, and 5 of more = red. Here the result suggests that the 27 delivered LAS files do not actually correspond to the logical flight lines but that the files are chopped up in some other way. We will have Andre Jalobeanu from Bayesmap repair this for us later.

number of flight lines covering each area: blue = 1, cyan = 2, yellow – 3, orange = 4, red = 5 or more

For the difference image, lasoverlap finds the maximal vertical difference between the lowest points from all flight lines that overlap for each 50 cm by 50 cm area and maps it to a color. If this difference is less than 10 cm, the area is colored white. Differences of 25 cm or more are colored either red or blue. All open areas such as roads, meadows and rooftops should be white here we definitely have way to much red and blue in the open areas.

vertical differences below 10 cm are white but red or blue if above 25 cm

There is way too much red and blue in areas that are wide open or on roof tops. We inspect this in further detail by taking a closer look at some of these red and blue areas. For this we first spatially index the strips with lasindex so that area-of-interest queries are accelerated, then load the strips into the GUI of lasview and add the difference image into the background via the overlay option.

lasindex ^
-i Samara\Livox
\00_raw_laz\*.laz ^
-tile_size 10 -maximum -100 ^
-cores 3

lasview ^
-i Samara\Livox
\00_raw_laz\*.laz ^
-gui

using the difference image as an overlay to inspect troublesome areas

This way is easy to lasview or clip out (with las2las) those areas that look especially troublesome. We do this here for the large condominium “Las Palmeras” whose roofline and pool provide perfect features to illustrate the misalignment. As you can see in the image sequence below, there is a horizontal shift of up to 1 meter that can be nicely visualized with a cross section drawn perpendicular across the gable of the roof and – due to the inability to get returns from water – in the area without points where the pool is.

The misalignments between flight lines are too big for the data to be useful as is, so we do what we always do when we have this problem: We write an email to Andre Jalobeanu from Bayesmap and ask for help.

After receiving the LAZ files and the trajectory file Andre repaired the misalignment in two steps. The first call to his software stripalign in mode ‘-cut’ recovered a proper set of flight lines and removed most of the LiDAR points from the moments when the drone was turning. The second call to his software stripalign in mode ‘-align’ computed the amount of misalignment in this set of flight lines and produced a new set of flight lines with these errors corrected as much as possible. The results are fabulous.

lasmerge ^
-i Samara_MID40\*.laz ^
-o samaramid40.laz

stripalign ^
-uav -cut ^
-i samaramid40.laz ^
-po Samara_MID40\*.txt -po_parse ntxyzwpk ^
-G2 -cut_dist 50 ^
-O Samara_MID40\cut

stripalign ^
-uav -align ^
-i Samara_MID40\cut\*.laz ^
-po Samara_MID40\*.txt -po_parse ntxyzwpk ^
-A -G2 -full -smap -rmap -sub 2 ^
-O Samara_MID40\corr

As you can see above, the improvements are incredible. The data seems now sufficiently aligned to be useful for being processed into a number of products. One last thing to do is the removal of spurious scan lines that seem to stem from an unusual movement of the drone, like the beginning or the end of a turn.

We use lasview with option ‘-load_gps_time’ to determine the GPS time stamps of these spurious scan lines and remove them manually using las2las with option ‘-drop_gps_time_between t1 t2’ or similar. As the points are ordered in acquisition order, we can simply replay the flight by pressing ‘p’ and step forward and backward with ‘s’ and ‘S’.

Using lasview with hot keys ‘i’, ‘p’, ‘s’ and ‘S’ we find the GPS time of points from the last reasonable scan line.

Once we determined a suitable set of GPS times to remove from a flight lines we first verify our findings once more visually using lasview before actually creating the final cut with las2las.

lasview ^
-i Samara\Livox
\02_strips_aligned\samaramid40_c_13_i_13.laz ^
-drop_gps_time_below 283887060 ^
-drop_gps_time_above 283887123 ^
-filtered_transform ^
-set_classification 8 ^
=color_by_classification

visualizing which points we keep by mapping them on-the-fly to classification 8 with a filtered transform

las2las ^
-i Samara\Livox
\02_strips_aligned\samaramid40_c_13_i_13.laz ^
-drop_gps_time_below 283887060 ^
-drop_gps_time_above 283887123 ^
-odix _cut -olaz

After spending several hours of manually removing these spurious scan lines as well as deciding to remove a few short scan lines in areas of exzessive overlap we have a sufficiently aligned and cleaned data set to start the actual post-processing.

A big “Thank You!” to Andre Jalobeanu from Bayesmap for his help in aligning the data and to Nelson Mattie from LiDAR Latinoamerica for bringing his fancy drone to Samara. You can download the data here.

final density after removing turns, spurious scan lines and redundant scan lines

LASmoons: Leonidas Alagialoglou

Leonidas Alagialoglou (recipient of three LASmoons)
Multimedia Understanding Group, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki, GREECE

Background:
Canopy height is a fundamental geometric tree parameter in supporting sustainable forest management. Apart from the standard height measurement method using LiDAR instruments, other airborne measurement techniques, such as very high-resolution passive airborne imaging, have also shown to provide accurate estimations. However, both methods suffer from high cost and cannot be regularly repeated.

Preliminary results of predicted CHE based on multi-temporal satellite images against ground-truth LiDAR measurements. The 3rd column depicts pixel-wise absolute error of prediction. Last column depicts pixel-wise uncertainty estimation of the prediction (in means of 3 standard deviations).

Goal:
In our study, we attempt to substitute airborne measurements with widely available satellite imagery. In addition to spatial and spectral correlations of a single-shot image, we seek to exploit temporal correlations of sequential lower resolution imagery. For this we use a convolutional variant of a recurrent neural network based model for estimating canopy height, based on a temporal sequence of Sentinel-2 images. Our model’s performance using sequential space borne imagery is shown to outperform the compared state-of-the-art methods based on costly airborne single-shot images as well as satellite images.

Digital Terrain Model of a part of the study area

Data:
The experimental study area of approximately 940 squared km is includes two national parks, Bavarian Forest National Park and Šumava National Park, which are located at the border between Germany and Czech Republic. LiDAR measurements of the area from 2017 and 2019 will be used as ground truth height measurements that have been provided by the national park’s authorities. Temporal sequences of Sentinel-2 imagery will be acquired from the Copernicus hub for canopy height estimation.

LAStools processing:
Accurate conversion of LAS files into DEM and DSM in order to acquire ground truth canopy height model.
1) Remove noise [lasthin, lasnoise]
2) Classify points into ground and non-ground [lasground, lasground_new]
3) Create DTMs and DSMs [lasthin, las2dem]

LASmoons: Zak Kus

Zak Kus (recipient of three LASmoons)
Topology Enthusiast
San Francisco, USA

Background:
While LiDAR data enables a lot of research and innovation in a lot of fields, it can also be used to create unique and visceral art. Using the high resolution data available, a 3D printer, and a long tool chain, we can create a physical, 3D topological map of the San Francisco bay area that shows off both the city’s hilly geology, and its unique skyline.

lasmoons_zak_kus_0

Test print of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park.

lasmoons_zak_kus_1

Test print of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park.

Goal:
The ultimate goal of this project is to create an accurate, unique physical map of San Francisco, and the surrounding areas, which will be given to a loved one as a birthday gift. Using the data from the 2010 ARRA-CA GoldenGate survey, we can filter and process the raw lidar data into a DEM format using LAStools, which can be converted using a python script into a “water tight” 3D printable STL file.

While the data works fairly well out of the box, it does require a lot of manual editing, to remove noise spikes, and to delineate the coast line from the water in low lng areas. Interestingly, while many sophisticated tools exist to edit STLs that could in theory be used to clean up and prepare the files at the STL stage, few are capable of even opening files with so much detailed data. Using LAStools to manually classify, and remove unwanted data is the only way to achieve the desired level of detail in the final piece.

Data:
+
LiDAR data provided through USGS OpenTopography, using the ARRA-CA GoldenGate 2010 survey
+ Average point density of 3.33 pts/m^2 (though denser around SF)
+ Covers 2638 km^2 in total (only a ~100 km^2 subset is used)

LAStools processing:
1)
Remove noise [lasnoise]
2) Manually clean up shorelines and problematic structures [lasview, laslayers]
3) Combine multiple tiles (to fit 3d printer) [lasmerge]
4) Create DEMs (asc format) for external tool to process [las2dem]

Removing Noise from Single Photon LiDAR to Generate a Smooth DTM

A while back we had a first look at the Single Photon LiDAR from Leica’s SPL100 sensor (that eventually turned out just to be an SPL99 because one beamlet or one receiver in the 10 by 10 array was broken and did not produce any returns). Today we are taking a closer look at a strategy to remove the excessive noise in the raw Single Photon LiDAR data from a “proper” SPL100 sensor (where all of the 100 beamlets are firing) that was flown in 2017 in Navarra, Spain.

navarra_spl_teaser

Profile through original points on top of generated DTM.

The data was provided as open data by the cartography section of Navarra’s Government and is available via a simple download FTP portal. We describe the LAStools processing steps that were used to eliminate the excessive noise and to generate a smooth DTM. In the following we are using the originally released version of the data, that we obtained shortly after the portal went online that seems to be a bit more “raw” than the current files available now. One starndard quality check with lasinfo was done with:

lasinfo -i 0_raw\*.laz ^
        -cd ^
        -histo intensity 1 ^
        -histo user_data 1 ^
        -histo point_source 1 ^
        -histo gps_time 10 ^
        -odir 1_quality -odix _info -otxt

Upon inspecting the lasinfo report we suggest a few changes in how to store this Single Photon LiDAR data for more efficient hosting via an online portal. We perform these changes here before starting the actual processing. First we use the las2las call shown below to fix an error in the global encoding bits, remove an irrelevant VLR, re-scale the coordinates from millimeter to centimeters, re-offset the coordinates to nice numbers, and – what is by far the most crucial change for better compression – remap the beamlet ID stored in the ‘user data’ field as described in an earlier article.

las2las -i 0_raw\*.laz ^
        -rescale 0.01 0.01 0.01 ^
        -auto_reoffset ^
        -set_global_encoding_gps_bit 1 ^
        -remove_vlr 1 ^
        -map_user_data beamlet_ID_map.txt ^
        -odir 2_fix_rescale_reoffset_remap -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Then we use two lassort calls, one to maximize compression and one to improve spatial coherence. One lassort call rearranges the points in increasing order first based on the GPS time stamps, then breaks ties based on the user data field (that stores the beamlet ID), and finally stores the returns of every beamlet ordered by return number. We also add spatial reference information in this step. The other lassort call rearranges the points into a spatially coherent layout. It uses a Z-order sort with the granularity of 50 meter by 50 meter buckets of points. Within each bucket the point order from the prior sort is kept.

lassort -i 2_fix_rescale_reoffset_remap\*.laz ^
        -epsg 25830 ^
        -gps_time ^
        -user_data ^
        -return_number ^
        -odir 2_maximum_compression -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lassort -i 2_maximum_compression\*.laz ^
        -bucket_size 50 ^
        -odir 2_spatial_coherence -olaz ^
        -cores 3

The resulting optimized nine tiles are around 200 MB each and can be downloaded as one file here or as individual tiles here:

Now we start the usual processing workflow by tiling the data with lastile into smaller 500 meter by 500 meter tiles with a 25 meter buffer. We also set the pre-existing point classification in the data to zero as we will compute our own later.

lastile -i 2_spatial_coherence\*.laz ^
        -set_classification 0 ^
        -tile_size 500 -buffer 25 -flag_as_withheld ^
        -odir 3_buffered -o yecora.laz

We notice that a large amount of the noise has intensity values below 1000. We are still a bit puzzled where those intensity values come from and what exactly they mean in a Single Photon LiDAR system. But it works. We run las2las with a “filtered transform” to set classification of all points whose intensity value is 1000 or less to the classification code 7 (aka “noise”).

las2las -i 3_buffered\*.laz ^
        -keep_intensity_below 1000 ^
        -filtered_transform ^
        -set_classification 7 ^
        -odir 4_intensity_denoised -olaz ^
        -cores 3

We then ignore this “easy-to-identify” noise and go after the remaining one with lasnoise by ignoring classification code 7 and setting the newly identified noise to classification code 9 – not because it’s “water” (the usual meaning of class 9) but because these points are drawn with a distinct blue color when checking the result with lasview.

 lasnoise -i 4_intensity_denoised\*.laz ^
         -ignore_class 7 ^
         -step_xy 1.0 -step_z 0.2 ^
         -isolated 5 ^
         -classify_as 9 ^
         -odir 4_isolation_denoised -olaz ^
         -cores 3

Of the surviving non-noise points we then use lasthin to reclassify the point closest to the 20th elevation percentile per 50 cm by 50 cm area with classification code 8 (for all areas that have more than 5 non-noise points per 50 cm by 50 cm area. We repeat the same for every 1 meter by 1 meter area.

lasthin -i 4_isolation_denoised\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 7 9 ^
        -step 0.5 -percentile 20 5 ^
        -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 5_thinned_p20_050cm -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 5_thinned_p20_050cm\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 7 9 ^
        -step 1.0 -percentile 20 5 ^
        -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 5_thinned_p20_100cm -olaz ^
        -cores 3

We then perform a more agressive second noise removal step one with lasnoise using only those points with classification code 8, namely those non-noise points that were the 20th elevation percentile in either a 50 cm by 50 cm cell or a 1 meter by 1 meter cell. This can be done by ignoring classification code 0, 7, and 9. We mark those noise points as 6 so they appear orange in the point cloud with lasview.

lasnoise -i 5_thinned_p20_100cm\*.laz ^
         -ignore_class 0 7 9 ^
         -step_xy 2.0 -step_z 0.2 ^
         -isolated 1 ^
         -classify_as 6 ^
         -odir 5_thinned_p20_100cm_denoised -olaz ^
         -cores 3

The 20th elevation percentile points that survive the last noise removal are then classified into ground (2) and non-ground (1) points with lasground_new by ignoring all other points, namely those with classification codes 0, 6, 7, and 9.

lasground_new -i 5_thinned_p20_100cm_denoised\*.laz ^
              -ignore_class 0 6 7 9 ^
              -town ^
              -odir 5_tiles_ground_050cm -olaz ^
              -cores 3

These images below illustrate the steps we took. They also show that not all data was used and might give you ideas where to tweak our workflow for even better results.

Finally we raster the ground points into 1 meter Digital Terrain Model (DTM) rasters with las2dem and store the result (without buffers) to the RasterLAZ format.

las2dem -i 5_tiles_ground_050cm\*.laz ^
        -keep_class 2 ^
        -step 1.0 ^
        -use_tile_bb ^
        -odir 6_tiles_dtm_100cm -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Finally we merged all RasterLAZ tiles into one and compute the final hillshaded DTM with blast2dem.

blast2dem -i 6_tiles_dtm_100cm\*.laz -merged ^
          -step 1.0 ^
          -hillshade ^
          -o yecora_dtm_100cm.png

The hillshaded DTM that is result of the entire sequence of processing steps described above is shown below.

DTM from ground classification created with LAStools

For comparison we generate the same DTM using the originally provided classification. According to the README file the original ground points are classified with code 22 in areas of flight line overlap and as the usual code 2 elsewhere. Hence we must use both classification codes to construct the DTM. We do this analogue to the earlier processing steps with the three LAStools commands lastile, las2dem, and blast2dem below.

lastile -i 2_spatial_coherence\*.laz ^
        -tile_size 500 -buffer 25 -flag_as_withheld ^
        -odir 3_tiles_buffered_orig -o yecora.laz

las2dem -i 3_tiles_buffered_orig\*.laz ^
        -keep_class 2 22 ^
        -step 1.0 ^
        -use_tile_bb ^
        -odir 6_tiles_dtm_100cm_orig -olaz ^
        -cores 3

blast2dem -i 6_tiles_dtm_100cm_orig\*.laz -merged ^
          -step 1.0 ^
          -hillshade ^
          -o yecora_dtm_100cm_orig.png

Below the hillshaded DTM generated from the ground classification that was provided with the LiDAR when it was originally released as open data.

DTM from ground classification of originally released data.

In the meantime Andorra’s SPL data have been updated with a newer version in the open data portal. The new version of the data contains a much better ground classification that might have been improved manually as the new files now have the the string ‘cam’ instead of ‘ca’ in the file name, which probably means ‘classified automatically and manually’ instead of the original ‘classified automatically’. We decided not to switch to the new data release as it seemed less “raw” than the original release. For example there are suddenly points with GPS times and returns counts and numbers of zero in the file that seem synthetic. But we also computed the hillshaded DTM for the new release which is shown below.

DTM from ground classification of newly released data.

We thank the cartography section of Navarra’s Government for providing their LiDAR as open data. This not only allows re-purposing expensive data paid for by public taxes but also generates additional value, encourages citizen science, and provides educational opportunity and insights such as this blog article.

Another German State Goes Open LiDAR: Saxony

Finally some really good news out of Saxony. 😊 After North Rhine-Westphalia and Thuringia released the first significant amounts of open geospatial data in Germany in a one-two punch in January 2017, we now have a third German state opening their entire tax-payer-funded geospatial data holdings to the tax-paying public via a simple and very easy-to-use online download portal. Welcome to the open data party, Saxony!!!

Currently available via the online portal are the LiDAR-derived raster Digital Terrain Model (DTM) at 1 meter resolution (DGM 1m) for everything flown since 2015 and and at 2 meter resolution (DGM 2m) or 20 meter resolution (DGM 20m) for the entire state. The horizontal coordinates use UTM zone 33 with ETRS89 (aka EPSG code 25833) and the vertical coordinate uses the “Deutsche Haupthöhennetz 2016” or “DHHN2016” (aka EPSG code 7837). Also available are orthophotos at 20 cm (!!!) resolution (DOP 20cm).

dgm_1000_rdax_87

Overview of current LiDAR holdings. Areas flown 2015 or later have LAS files and 1 meter rasters. Others have LiDAR as ASCII files and lower resolution rasters.

Offline – by ordering through either this online form or that online form – you can also get the 5 meter DTM and the 10 meter DTM, the raw LiDAR point clouds, LiDAR intensity rasters, hill-shaded DTM rasters, as well as the 1 meter and the 2 meter Digital Surface Model (DSM) for a small administrative fee that ranges between 25 EUR and 500 EUR depending on the effort involved.

Our immediate thought is to get a copy on the entire raw LiDAR points clouds (available as LAS 1.2 files for all  data acquired since 2015 and as ASCII text for earlier acquisitions) and find some portal willing to hosts this data online. We are already in contact with the land survey of Saxony to discuss this option and/or alternate plans.

Let’s have a look at the data. First we download four 2 km by 2 km tiles of the 1 meter DTM raster for an area surrounding the so called “Greifensteine” using the interactive map of the download portal, which are provided as simple XYZ text. Here a look at the contents of one ot these tiles:

more Greifensteine\333525612_dgm1.xyz
352000 5613999 636.26
352001 5613999 636.27
352002 5613999 636.28
352003 5613999 636.27
352004 5613999 636.24
[...]

Note that the elevation are not sampled in the center of every 1 meter by 1 meter cell but exactly on the full meter coordinate pair, which seems especially common  in German-speaking countries. Using txt2las we convert these XYZ rasters to LAZ format and add geo-referencing information for more efficient subsequent processing.

txt2las -i greifensteine\333*_dgm1.xyz ^
        -set_scale 1 1 0.01 ^
        -epsg 25833 ^
        -olaz

Below you see that going from XYZ to LAZ reduces the amount of  data from 366 MB to 10.4 MB, meaning that the data on disk becomes over 35 times smaller. The ability of LASzip to compress elevation rasters was first noted during the search for missing airliner MH370 and resulted in our new LAZ-based compressor for height grid called DEMzip.  The resulting LAZ files now also include geo-referencing information.

96,000,000 333525610_dgm1.xyz
96,000,000 333525612_dgm1.xyz
96,000,000 333545610_dgm1.xyz
96,000,000 333545612_dgm1.xyz
384,000,000 bytes

2,684,820 333525610_dgm1.laz
2,590,516 333525612_dgm1.laz
2,853,851 333545610_dgm1.laz
2,795,430 333545612_dgm1.laz
10,924,617 bytes

Using blast2dem we then create a hill-shaded version of the 1 meter DTM in order to overlay a visual representation of the DTM onto Google Earth.

blast2dem -i greifensteine\333*_dgm1.laz ^
          -merged ^
          -step 1 ^
          -hillshade ^
          -o greifensteine.png

Below the result that nicely shows how the penetrating laser of the LiDAR allows us to strip away the forest to see interesting geological features in the bare-earth terrain.

In a second exercise we use the available RGB orthophoto images to color one of the DTM tiles and explore it using lasview. For this we download the image for the top left of the four tiles that covers the area containing the “Greifensteine” from the interactive download portal for orthophotos. As the resolution of the TIF image is 20 cm and that of the DTM is only 1 meter, we first down-sample the TIF using gdalwarp of GDAL.

gdalwarp -tr 1 1 ^
         -r cubic ^
         greifensteine\dop20c_33352_5612.tif ^
         greifensteine\dop1m_33352_5612.tif

If you are not yet using GDAL today is a good day to start. It nicely complements the point cloud processing functionality of LAStools for raster inputs. Next we use lascolor to give each elevation pixel of the DTM stored in LAZ format its corresponding color from the orthophoto.

lascolor -i greifensteine\333525612_dgm1.laz ^
         -image greifensteine\dop1m_33352_5612.tif ^
         -odix _rgb -olaz

Now we can view the colored DTM in LAZ format interactively with lasview or any other LiDAR viewing software and turn on the RGB colors from the orthophoto as needed to understand the scene.

lasview -i greifensteine\333525612_dgm1_rgb.laz

We thank the “Staatsbetrieb Geobasisinformation und Vermessung Sachsen (GeoSN)” for giving us easy access to the 1 meter DTM and the 20 cm orthophoto that we have used in this article through their new open geodata portal as open data under the user-friendly license “Datenlizenz Deutschland – Namensnennung – Version 2.0.

Smooth DTM from Drone LiDAR off Velodyne HDL 32A mounted on DJI M600 UAV

Recently we attempted to do a small LiDAR survey by drone for a pet project of our CEO in our “code and surf camp” here in Samara, Costa Rica. But surveying is difficult when you are a novice and we ran into a trajectory issue. The dramatic “wobbles” were entirely our fault, but fortunately our mistakes also led to something useful: We found some LAS export bugs. Our laser scanner was a Velodyne HDL-32E integrated with a NovAtel INS into the Snoopy Series A HD made by LiDARUSA. The system was carried by a DJI Matrice 600 (M600) drone. We processed the trajectory with NovAtel Inertial Explorer (here we made the “wobbles” error) and finally exported the LAS and LAZ files with ScanLook PC (version 1.0.182) from LiDARUSA.

While we were investigating our “wobbles” (which clearly were our mistake) we also found five different LAS export bugs in ScanLook PC that seem to have started sometime after version 1.0.171 and will likely end with version 1.0.193. Below an illustration of a correct export from version 1.0.129 and a buggy export from version 1.0.182. In both instances you see the returns from one revolution of the Velodyne HDL-32E scanner head ordered by their GPS time stamps and colored to distinguish the 32 separate beams. In the buggy version, groups of around seven non-adjacent returns are given the same time stamp. This bug will only affect you, if correct GPS time stamps are important for your subsequent LiDAR processing or if your client explicitly asked for ASPRS specification compliant LAS files. We plan to publish another blog post detailing how to find this GPS time stamping bug (and the other four bugs we found).

During the many interactions we had working through “wobbles” and export bugs, we obtained a nice set of six flight lines from Seth Gulich of Bowman Consulting – a US American company based in Stuart, Florida – who flew an identical “Snoopy Series A HD” system also on a DJI Matrice 600 drone at approximately 100 feet above ground level above a model airplane airport in Palm Beach, Florida. You can download the data set here. In the following we will check the flight line alignment of this data set and then process it into a smooth DTM. All command lines used are summarized in this text file.

First we generate a lasinfo report that includes a number of histograms for on-the-fly merged flight lines with lasinfo and then use the z coordinate histogram from the lasinfo report to set reasonable min/max values for the elevation color ramp of lasview:

lasinfo -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz -merged ^
        -cd ^
        -histo z 1 ^
        -histo user_data 1 ^
        -histo point_source 1 ^
        -o 1_quality\Velodyne_merged_info.txt

lasview -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
        -points 10000000 ^
        -set_min_max 25 75

The lasinfo report shows no information about the coordinate reference system. We found out experimentally that the horizontal coordinates seem to be EPSG code 2236 and that the vertical units are most likely be US survey feet. The warnings you will see in the lasinfo report have to do with the fact that the double-precision bounding box stored in the LAS header was populated with numbers that have many more decimal digits than the coordinates in the file, which only have millifeet resolution as all three scale factors are 0.001 (meaning coordinates have three decimal digits). The information which of the 32 lasers was collecting which point is stored in both the ‘user data’ and the ‘point source ID’ field which is evident from the histograms in the lasinfo report. We need to be careful not to override both fields in later processing.

Next we use lasoverlap to check how well the LiDAR points from the flight out and the flight back align vertically. This tool computes the difference of the lowest points for each square foot covered by multiple flight lines. Differences of less than a quarter of a foot are both times mapped to white, differences of more than one foot (more than half a foot) are mapped to saturated red or blue depending on whether the difference is positive or negative in the first run (in the second run):

lasoverlap -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
           -faf ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.00 -step 1 ^
           -odir 1_quality -o overlap_025_100.png

lasoverlap -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
           -faf ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 0.50 -step 1 ^
           -odir 1_quality -o overlap_025_050.png

We use a new feature of the LAStools GUI (as of version 180429) to closer inspect large red or blue areas. With lasmerge we clip out regions that looks suspect for closer examination with lasview. First we spatially index the flight lines to make this process faster. With the ‘-gui’ switch we start the tool in GUI mode with flight lines already loaded. Using the new PNG overlay roll-out on the left we add the ‘overlap_025_050_diff.png’ image from the quality folder created in the last step and clip out three areas.

lasindex -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz
         -tile_size 10 -maximum -100 ^
         -cores 3

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz -gui

You can also clip out these three areas using the command lines below:

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside_tile 939500 889860 100 ^
         -o 1_quality\939500_889860.laz

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside_tile 940400 889620 100 ^
         -o 1_quality\940400_889620.laz

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside_tile 940500 890180 100 ^
         -o 1_quality\940500_890180.laz

The reader may inspect the areas 939500_889860.laz, 940400_889620.laz, and 940500_890180.laz with lasview using profile views via hot keys ‘x’ and switching back and forth between the points from different flight lines via hot keys ‘0’, ‘1’, ‘2’, ‘3’, … for individual and ‘a’ for all flight lines as we have done it in previous tutorials [1,2,3]. Using drop-lines or rise-lines via the pop-up menu gives you a sense of scale. Removing points with lastrack that are horizontally too far from the trajectory could be one strategy to use fewer outliers. But as our surfaces are expected to be “fluffy” (because we have a Velodyne LiDAR system), we accept these flight line differences and continue processing.

Here the complete LAStools processing pipeline for creating an average ground model from the set of six flight lines that results in the hillshaded DTM shown below. The workflow is similar to those we have developed in earlier blog posts for Velodyne Puck based systems like the Hovermap and the Yellowscan and in the other Snoopy tutorial. All command lines used are summarized in this text file.

Hillshaded DTM with half foot resolution generated via average ground computation with LAStools.

In the first step we lastile the six flight lines into 250 by 250 feet tiles with 25 feet buffer while preserving flight line information. The flight line information will be stored in the “point source ID” field of each point and therefore override the beam ID that is currently stored there. But the beam ID is also stored in the “user data” field as the  lasinfo report had told us. We set all classifications to zero and add information about the horizontal coordinate reference system EPSG code 2236 and the vertical units (US Survey Feet).

lastile -i 0_strips_raw\*.laz ^
        -faf ^
        -set_classification 0 ^
        -epsg 2236 -elevation_survey_feet ^
        -tile_size 250 -buffer 25 -flag_as_withheld ^
        -odir 2_tiles_raw -o pb.laz

On three cores in parallel we then lassort the points in the tiles into a space-filling curve order which will accelerate later operations.

lassort -i 2_tiles_raw\*.laz ^
        -odir 2_tiles_sorted -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Next we use lasthin to classify the point whose elevation is closest to the 5th elevation percentile among all points falling into its cell with classification code 8. We run lasthin multiple times and each time increase the cell size from 1, 2, 4, 8 to 16 foot. We do this because we have requested the 5th elevation percentile to only be computed when there are at least 20 points in the cell. Percentiles are statistical measures and need a reasonable sample size to be stable. Because drone flights are very dense in the center and more sparse at the edges this increase in cell size assures that we have a good selection of points classified with classification code 8 across the entire survey area.

lasthin -i 2_tiles_sorted\*.laz ^
        -step 1 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step01 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step01\*.laz ^
        -step 2 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step02 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step02\*.laz ^
        -step 4 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step04 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step04\*.laz ^
        -step 8 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step08 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step08\*.laz ^
        -step 16 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step16 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Then we let lasground_new run on only the points classified with classification code 8 (i.e. by ignoring the points still classified with code 0) which classifies them into ground (code 2) and non-ground (code 1).

lasground_new -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step16\*.laz ^
              -ignore_class 0 ^
              -town ^
              -odir 4_tiles_ground_low -olaz ^
              -cores 3

The ground points we have computed form somewhat of a lower envelope of the “fluffy” points of a Velodyne scanner. With lasheight we now draw all the points near the ground – namely those from 0.1 foot below to 0.4 foot above the ground – into a new classification code 6 that we term “thick ground”. The ‘-do_not_store_in_user_data’ switch prevent the default behavior of lasheight from happening, which would override the beam ID information that it stored in the ‘user data’ field with approximate height value.

lasheight -i 4_tiles_ground_low\*.laz ^
          -classify_between -0.1 0.4 6 ^
          -do_not_store_in_user_data ^
          -odir 4_tiles_ground_thick -olaz ^
          -cores 3

A few close-up shots of the resulting “thick ground” are shown in the picture gallery below.

We then use lasgrid to average the (orange) thick ground points onto a regular grid with a cell spacing of half a foot. We do not grid the tile buffers by adding the ‘-use_tile_bb’ switch.

lasgrid -i 4_tiles_ground_thick\*.laz ^
        -keep_class 6 ^
        -step 0.5 -average ^
        -use_tile_bb ^
        -odir 5_tiles_gridded_mean_ground -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Finally we use blast2dem to merge all the averaged ground point grids into one file, interpolate across open areas without ground points, and compute the hillshaded DTM shown above. All command lines used are summarized in this text file.

blast2dem -i 5_tiles_gridded_mean_ground\*.laz ^
          -merged ^
          -step 0.5 ^
          -hillshade ^
          -o dtm.png

We thank Seth Gulich of Bowman Consulting for sharing this LiDAR data set with us. It was flown with a DJI Matrice 600 drone carrying a “Snoopy A series HD” LiDAR system from LidarUSA.

Using Open LiDAR to Remove Low Noise from Photogrammetric UAV Point Clouds

We collected drone imagery of the restored “Kance” tavern during the lunch stop of the UAV Tartu summer school field trip (actually the organizer Marko Kohv did that, as I was busy introducing students to SUP boarding). With Agisoft PhotoScan we then processed the images into point clouds below the deck of the historical “Jõmmu” barge on the way home (actually Marko did that, because I was busy enjoying the view of the wetlands in the afternoon sun). The resulting data set with 7,855,699 points is shown below and can be downloaded here.

7,855,699 points produced with Agisoft Photoscan

Generating points using photogrammetric techniques in scenes containing water bodies tends to be problematic as dense blotches of noise points above and below the water surface are common as you can see in the picture below. Especially the low points are troublesome as they adversely affect ground classification which results in poor Digital Elevation Models (DTMs).

Clusters of low noise points nearly 2 meters below the actual surface in water areas.

In a previous article we have described a LAStools workflow that can remove excessive low noise. In this article here we use external information about the topography of the area to clean our photogrammetry points. How convenient that the Estonian Land Board has just released their entire LiDAR archives as open data.

Following these instructions here you can download the available open LiDAR for this area, which has the map sheet index 475681. Alternatively you can download the four currently available data sets here flown in spring 2010, in summer 2013, in spring 2014, and in summer 2017. In the following we will use the one flown in spring 2014.

We can view both data sets simultaneously in lasview. By adding ‘-faf’ to the command-line we can switch back and forth between the two data sets by pressing ‘0’ and ‘1’.

lasview -i Kantsi.laz ^
        -i 475681_2014_tava.laz ^
        -points 10000000 ^
        -faf

We find cut the 1 km by 1 km LiDAR tile down to a 250 m by 250 m tile that nicely surrounds our photogrammetric point set using the following las2las command-line:

las2las -i 475681_2014_tava.laz ^
        -inside_tile 681485 6475375 250 ^
        -o LiDAR_Kantsi.laz

lasview -i Kantsi.laz ^
        -i LiDAR_Kantsi.laz ^
        -points 10000000 ^
        -faf

Scrutinizing the two data sets we quickly find that there is a miss-alignment between the dense imagery-derived and the comparatively sparse LiDAR point clouds. With lasview we investigate the difference between the two point clouds by hovering over a point from one point cloud and pressing <i> and then hovering over a somewhat corresponding point from the other point cloud and pressing <SHIFT>+<i>. We measure displacements of around 2 meters vertically and of around 3 to 3.5 meter in total.

Before we can use the LiDAR points to remove the low noise from the photogrammetric points we must align them properly. For simple translation errors this can be done with a new feature that was recently added to lasview. Make sure to download the latest version (190404 or newer) of LAStools to follow the steps shown in the image sequence below.

las2las -i Kantsi.laz ^
        -translate_xyz 0.89 -1.90 2.51 ^
        -o Kantsi_shifted.laz

lasview -i Kantsi_shifted.laz ^
        -i LiDAR_Kantsi.laz ^
        -points 10000000 ^
        -faf

The result looks good in the sense that both sides of the photogrammetric roof are reasonably well aligned with the LiDAR. But there is still a shift along the roof so we repeat the same thing once more as shown in the next image sequence:

We use a suitable displacement vector and apply it to the photogrammetry points, shifting them again:

las2las -i Kantsi_shifted.laz ^
        -translate_xyz -1.98 -0.95 0.01 ^
        -o Kantsi_shifted_again.laz

lasview -i Kantsi_shifted_again.laz ^
        -i LiDAR_Kantsi.laz ^
        -points 10000000 ^
        -faf

The result is still not perfect as there is also some rotational error and you may find another software such as Cloud Compare more suited to align the two point clouds, but for this exercise the alignment shall suffice. Below you see the match between the photogrammetry points and the LiDAR TIN before and after shifting the photogrammetry points with the two (interactively determined) displacement vectors.

The final steps of this exercise use las2dem and the already ground-classified LiDAR compute a 1 meter DTM, which we then use as input to lasheight. We classify the photogrammetry points using their height above this set of ground points with 1 meter spacing: points that are 40 centimeter or more below the LiDAR DTM are classified as noise (7), points that are between 40 below to 1 meter above the LiDAR DTM are classified to a temporary class (here we choose 8) that has those points that could potentially be ground points. This will help, for example, with subsequent ground classification as large parts of the photogrammetry points – namely those on top of buildings and in higher vegetation – can be ignored from the start by a ground classification algorithm such as lasground.

las2dem -i LiDAR_Kantsi.laz ^
        -keep_class 2 ^
        -kill 1000 ^
        -o LiDAR_Kantsi_dtm_1m.bil
lasheight -i Kantsi_shifted_again.laz ^
          -ground_points LiDAR_Kantsi_dtm_1m.bil ^
          -classify_below -0.4 7 ^
          -classify_between -0.4 1.0 8 ^
          -o Kantsi_cleaned.laz

Below the results we have achieved after “roughly” aligning the two point clouds with some new lasview tricks and then using the LiDAR elevations to classify the photogrammetry points into “low noise”, “potential ground”, and “all else”.

We thank the Estonian Land Board for providing open data with a permissive license. Special thanks also go to the organizers of the UAV Summer School in Tartu, Estonia and the European Regional Development Fund for funding this event. Especially fun was the fabulous excursion to the Emajõe-Suursoo Nature Reserve and through to Lake Peipus aboard, overboard and aboveboard the historical barge “Jõmmu”. If you look carefully you can also find the barge in the photogrammetry point cloud. The photogrammetry data used here was acquired during our lunch stop.

Fun aboard and overboard the historical barge “Jõmmu”.

No Sugarcoating: Sweet LiDAR from RiCOPTER carrying VUX-1UAV over Sugarcane

Recently we saw an interesting LiDAR data set talked about on social media by Chad Netto from Chustz Surveying in New Roads, Louisiana and asked for a copy. It is a LiDAR scan of a sugarcane plantation in Assumption Parish, Louisiana carried out with the VUX-1UAV by RIEGL mounted onto a RiCOPTER and guided by an Applanix IMU and a Trimble base station. That is probably one of the sweetest (but also one of the most expensive) UAV LiDAR system you can buy today. I received this LiDAR file and this trajectory file. In the following we talk a detailed look at this data set.

First we run lasinfo to get an idea of the contents of the data set. We create various histograms as those can often help understand an unfamiliar data set:

lasinfo -i sugarcane\181026_163424.laz ^
        -cd ^
        -histo gps_time 5 ^
        -histo intensity 64 ^
        -histo point_source 1 ^
        -histo z 5 ^
        -odix _info -otxt

You can download the resulting report here. For the 84,751,955 points we notice that

  1. both horizontal and vertical coordinates are stored in US survey feet
  2. with scale factors of 0.00025 this means a resolution of 76 micrometer
  3. there is no explicit flight line information (all point source IDs are zero)
  4. gaps in the GPS time stamp histogram are suggesting multiple lines

First we use las2las to lower the insanely high resolution from 0.00025 US survey feet to something more reasonable for an airborne UAV scan, namely to 0.01 or 1 hundredths of a US survey foot or centi-US-survey-feet:

las2las -i sugarcane\181026_163424.laz ^
        -rescale 0.01 0.01 0.01 ^
        -odix _cft -olaz

I have already done this for you. The file that is online is already in “centi-US-survey-feet” because it reduced the file size from the original 678 MB file that we got from Netto to the 518 MB file that is online, meaning that you had 160 MB less data to download.

Next we use lassplit to recover the original flight lines as follows:

lassplit -i sugarcane\181026_163424.laz ^
         -recover_flightlines ^
         -odir sugarcane\0_recovered_strips ^
         -o assumption.laz

This results in 5 strips. We then use lassort to bring the strips back into their original acquisition order by sorting first based on the GPS time stamp (which brings all returns of one pulse together) and second on the return number (which sorts them in ascending order). We do this on 3 cores in parallel with this command:

lassort -i sugarcane\0_recovered_strips\*.laz ^
        -gps_time ^
        -return_number ^
        -odir sugarcane\1_sorted_strips -olaz ^
        -cores 3

We also create a spatial index for each of these strips using lasindex so that any area-of-interest query that we do later will be significantly accelerated. See the README file for the meaning of the parameters:

lasindex -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
         -tile_size 10 -maximum -100 ^
         -cores 3

Then we check for flight line alignment using lasoverlap by comparing – per 2 feet by 2 feet area – the lowest elevation value of points from different strips wherever there is overlap. Cells with an absolute vertical difference of less than a quarter of a foot are mapped to white. Cells with vertical differences of more (or less) than a quarter foot are mapped to an increasingly red (or blue) color that is saturated red (or blue) when one full foot is reached.

lasoverlap -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
           -files_are_flightlines ^
           -step 2.0 ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.0 ^
           -o sugarcane\2_quality\overlap.png

The resulting image looks dramatic at first glance. But we have to remember that this is sugarcane. The penetration of the laser can vary greatly depending on the direction from which the beam hits the densely standing stalks. Large differences between flight lines can be expected where sugarcane stands tall. We need to focus our visual quality checks on the few open areas, namely the access roads and harvested areas.

Color-mapped highest vertical difference in lowest point per 2 feet by 2 feet area between overlapping flight lines.

We use las2las via its native GUI to cut out several suspicious-looking open areas with overly red or overly blue shading. By loading the resulting image into the GUI these areas-of-interest are easy to target and cut out.

las2las -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz -gui

Overlaying the difference image in the GUI of las2las to cut out suspicious areas for closer inspection.

We cut out four square 100 by 100 meter tiles in open areas that show a suspiciously strong pattern of red or blue colors for closer inspection. The command lines for these four square areas are given below and you can download them here:

  1. assumption_3364350_534950_100.laz
  2. assumption_3365600_535750_100.laz
  3. assumption_3364900_535500_100.laz
  4. assumption_3365500_535600_100.laz
las2las -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
        -merged -faf ^
        -inside_tile 3364350 534950 100 ^
        -o sugarcane\assumption_3364350_534950_100.laz

las2las -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
        -merged -faf ^
        -inside_tile 3365600 535750 100 ^
        -o sugarcane\assumption_3365600_535750_100.laz

las2las -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
        -merged -faf ^
        -inside_tile 3364900 535500 100 ^
        -o sugarcane\assumption_3364900_535500_100.laz

las2las -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
        -merged -faf ^
        -inside_tile 3365500 535600 100 ^
        -o sugarcane\assumption_3365500_535600_100.laz

In the image sequence below we scrutinize these differences which will lead us to notice two things:

  1. There are vertical miss-alignments of around one foot. These big difference can especially be observed between flight lines that cover an area with a very high point density and those that cover the very same area with a very low point density.
  2. There are horizontal miss-alignments of around one foot. Again these differences seem somewhat correlated to the density that these flight lines cover a particular area with.

For the most part the miss-aligned points come from a flight line that has only sparse coverage in that area. In a flat terrain the return density per area goes down the farther we are from the drone as those areas are only reached with higher and higher scan angles. Hence an immediate idea that comes to mind is to limit the scan angle to those closer to nadir and lower the range from -81 to 84 degrees reported in the lasinfo report to something like -75 to 75, -70 to 70, or -65 to 65 degrees. We can check how this will improve the alignment with these lasoverlap command lines:

lasoverlap -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
           -files_are_flightlines ^
           -keep_scan_angle -75 75 ^
           -step 2.0 ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.0 ^
           -o sugarcane\2_quality\overlap75.png

lasoverlap -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
           -files_are_flightlines ^
           -keep_scan_angle -70 70 ^
           -step 2.0 ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.0 ^
           -o sugarcane\2_quality\overlap70.png

lasoverlap -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
           -files_are_flightlines ^
           -keep_scan_angle -65 65 ^
           -step 2.0 ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.0 ^
           -o sugarcane\2_quality\overlap65.png

lasoverlap -i sugarcane\1_sorted_strips\*.laz ^
           -files_are_flightlines ^
           -keep_scan_angle -60 60 ^
           -step 2.0 ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.0 ^
           -o sugarcane\2_quality\overlap60.png

This simple technique significantly improves the difference image. Based on these images would suggest to only use returns with a scan angle between -70 and 70 degrees for any subsequent analysis. This seems to remove most of the discoloring in open areas without loosing too many points. Note that only using returns with a scan angle between -60 and 60 degrees means that some flight lines are no longer overlapping each other.

Note also that by limiting the scan angle we get suddenly get white areas even in incredible dense vegetation. The more horizontal a laser shoot is the more likely it will only hit higher up sugarcane plants and the less likely it will penetrate all the way to the ground. The white areas coincide with where laser pulses are close to nadir which is in the flight line overlap areas that directly below the drone’s trajectory.

Can we improve alignment further? Not with LAStools, so I turned to Andre Jalobeanu, a specialist on that particular issue, who I have known for many years. Andre has developed BayesStripAlign – a software by his company BayesMap that is quite complementary to LAStools and does exactly what the name suggests: it align strips. I gave Andre the five flight lines and he aligned them for me. Below the new difference images:

We cut out the very same four square areas from the realigned strips for closer inspection and you may investigate them on your own. You can download them here.

  1. assumption_3364350_534950_100_realigned.laz
  2. assumption_3365600_535750_100_realigned.laz
  3. assumption_3364900_535500_100_realigned.laz
  4. assumption_3365500_535600_100_realigned.laz

In the image sequence below we are just looking at the last of the four square areas and you can see that most of the miss-alignment we saw earlier between the flight lines was removed.

We would like to thank Chad Netto from Chustz Surveying to make this data set available to us and Andre Jalobeanu from BayesMap to align the flight lines for us.

City of Guadalajara creates first Open LiDAR Portal of Latin America

Small to medium sized LiDAR data sets can easily be published online for exploration and download with laspublish of LAStools, which is an easy-to-use wrapper around the powerful Potree open source software for which rapidlasso GmbH has been a major sponsor. During a workshop on LiDAR processing at CICESE in Ensenada, Mexico we learned that Guadalajara – the city with five “a” in its name – has recently published its LiDAR holdings online for download using an interactive 3D portal based on Potree.

There is a lot more data available in Mexico but only Guadalajara seems to have an interactive download portal at the moment with open LiDAR. Have a look at the map below to get an idea of the LiDAR holdings that are held in the archives of the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI). You can request this data either by filling out this form or by sending an email to atencion.usuarios@inegi.org.mx. You will need to explain the use of the information, but apparently INEGI has a fast response time. I was given the KML files you see below and told that each letter in scale 1: 50,000 is divided into 6 regions (a-f) and each region subdivided into 4 parts. Contact me if you want the KML files or if you can provide further clarification on this indexing scheme and/or the data license.

LiDAR available at the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI)

But back to Guadalajara’s open LiDAR. The tile names become visible when you zoom in closer on the map with the tiling overlay as seen below. An individual tile can easily be downloaded by first clicking so that it becomes highlighted and then pressing the “D” button in the lower left corner. We download the two tiles called ‘F08C04.laz’ and ‘F08C05.laz’ and use lasinfo to determine that their average density is 9.0 and 8.9 last returns per per square meter. This means on average 9 laser pulses were fired at each square meter in those two tiles.

lasinfo -i F08C04.laz -cd
lasinfo -i F08C05.laz -cd

Selecting a tile on the map and pressing the “D” button will download the highlighted tile.

The minimal quality check that we recommend doing for any newly obtained LiDAR data is to verify proper alignment of the flightlines using lasoverlap. For tiles with properly populated ‘point source ID’ fields this can be done using the command line shown below.

lasoverlap -i F08C04.laz F08C05.laz ^
           -min_diff 0.1 -max_diff 0.3 ^
           -odir quality -opng ^
           -cores 2

We notice some slight miss-alignments in the difference image (see other tutorials such as this one for how to interpret the resulting color images). We suggest you follow the steps done there to take a closer look at some of the larger strip-like areas that exhibit some systematic disscolorization (compared to other areas) into overly blueish or reddish tones of with lasview. Overlaying one of the resulting *_diff.png files in the GUI of LAStools makes it easy to pick a suspicious area.

We use the “pick” functionality to view only the building of interest.

Unusual are also the large red and blue areas where some of the taller buildings are. Usually those are just one pixel wide which has to do with the laser of one flightline not being able to see the lower area seen by the laser of the other flightline because the line-of-sight is blocked by the structure. We have a closer look at one of these unusual building colorization by picking the building shown above and viewing it with the different visualization options that are shown in the images below.

No. Those are not the “James Bond movie” kind of lasers that burn holes into the building to get ground returns through several floors. The building facade is covered with glass so that the lasers do not scatter photons when they hit the side of the building. Instead they reflect by the usual rule “incidence angle equals reflection angle” of perfectly specular surfaces and eventually hit the ground next to the building. Some of the photons travel back the same way to the receiver on the plane where they get registered as returns. The LiDAR system has no way to know that the photons did not travel the usual straight path. It only measures the time until the photons return and generates a return at the range corresponding to this time along the direction vector that this laser shot was fired at. If the specular reflection of the photons hits a truck or a tree situated next to to building, then we should find that truck or that tree – mirrored by the glossy surface of the building – on the inside of the building. If you look careful at the “slice” through the building below you may find an example … (-:

Some objects located outside the building are mirrored into the building due to its glossy facade.

Kudos to the City of Guadalajara for becoming – to my knowledge – the first city in Latin America to both open its entire LiDAR holdings and also making it available for download in form of a nice and functional interactive 3D portal.