Removing Low Noise in LiDAR Points with Median Ground Surface

Recently a user of LAStools asked a question in our user forum about how to classify LiDAR data that contains lots of low noise. A sample screen shot of the user’s failed attempt to correctly classify the noise using lasnoise and the ground with lasground is shown below: red points are noise, brown points are ground, and grey points are unclassified. In this article we show how to remove this low noise using a temporary ground surface that we construct from a subset of points at a certain elevation percentile. You can follow along by downloading the data and the sequence of command lines used.

example of miss-classified low noise points: ground points (brown) below ground

Download the LiDAR data set that was apparently flown with a RIEGL “crossfire” Q1560. You can also download the command line sequence here. We first run lasinfo with option ‘-compute_density’ (or ‘-cd’ for short) to get a rough idea about the last return density which is quite high with an average of over 31 last returns per square meter. We then use lasthin to classify one last return per square meter with the temporary classification code 8, namely the one whose elevation is closest to the 20th percentile per 1 meter by 1 meter grid cell. We then repeat this command line for the 30th, 40th, 50th percentile modifying the command line accordingly. You must use this version of lasthin that will part of a future LAStools release as options ‘-ignore_first_of_many’ and ‘-ignore_intermediate’ were just added this weekend.

lasthin -i crossfire.laz ^
        -ignore_first_of_many -ignore_intermediate ^
        -step 1 ^
        -percentile 20 15 ^
        -classify_as 8 ^
        -odix _p20 -olaz

Below you see the resulting subset of points marked with the temporary classification code 8 for the four different percentiles 20th, 30th, 40th, and 50th triangulated into a surface and hill-shaded.

Next we reclassify only those points marked with the temporary classification code 8 into ground (2) and unclassified (1) points using lasground by ignoring all points that still have the original classification code 0.

lasground -i crossfire_p20.laz ^
          -ignore_class 0 ^
          -wilderness ^
          -odix g -olaz

Below you see the resulting ground points computed from the subsets of points at four different percentiles 20th, 30th, 40th, and 50th triangulated into a surface and hill-shaded.

Both the ground classification of the 40th and the 50th percentile look reasonable. Only a few down spikes remain in the 40th percentile surface and a few additional bumps appear in the 50th percentile surface. Next we use lasheight with those two reasonable-looking ground surfaces to classify all points that are 20 centimeter below the triangulated ground surface into the noise classification code 7.

lasheight -i crossfire_p40g.laz ^
          -classify_below -0.2 7 ^
          -do_not_store_in_user_data ^
          -odix h -olaz

Now that the low noise points were removed (or rather classified as noise) we start the actual ground classification process. In this example we want to create a 50 cm DTM, hence it is more than sufficient to find one ground point per 25 cm cell. Therefore we first move all lowest non-noise last return per 25 cm cell to the temporary classification code 8.

Side note: One might also consider to modify the following workflow to run the ground classification on more than just the last returns by omitting ‘-ignore_first_of_many’ and ‘-ignore_intermediate’ from the lasthin call and by adding ‘-all_returns’ to the lasground call. Why? Because for all laser shots that resulted in a low noise point, this noise point will usually be the last return, so that the true ground hit could be the second to last return.

lasthin -i crossfire_p40gh.laz ^
        -ignore_first_of_many -ignore_intermediate ^
        -ignore_class 7 ^
        -step 0.25 ^
        -lowest ^
        -classify_as 8 ^
        -odix _low25 -olaz

The final ground classification is obtained by running lasground only on the points with temporary classification code 8 by ignoring all others, namely the noise points (7) and the unclassified points (0 and 1).

lasground -i crossfire_p40gh_low25.laz ^
          -ignore_class 0 1 7 ^
          -wilderness ^
          -odix g -olaz

We then use las2dem to create the 50 cm DTM from the points classified as ground. We store this DTM raster to the LAZ format which has shown to be the most efficient format for storing elevation or height rasters. We have started calling this format RasterLAZ. It is supported by all LAStools and the new DEMzip tool. One advantage is that we can feed RasterLAZ directly back into LAStools, for example as done below, for a second call to las2dem that computes a hill-shaded DTM.

las2dem -i crossfire_p40gh_low25g.laz ^
        -keep_class 2 ^
        -step 0.5 ^
        -ocut 9 -odix _dtm50 -olaz

las2dem -i crossfire_p40_dtm50.laz ^
        -step 0.5 ^
        -hillshade ^
        -odix _hill -opng

Below the resulting hill-shaded DTMs computed for the 40th and the 50th elevation percentile – as well as for the 45th elevation percentile that we’ve added for comparison.

Below we finally take a closer look at an example 1 meter profile line through the LiDAR classified by the 45th percentile workflow. There is a small stretch of ground points that was incorrectly classified as noise points (find the mouse cursor) so it might be worthwhile to change parameters slightly to make the noise classification less aggressive.

Side note follow-up: The return coloring shows there are indeed some ‘intermediate’ as well some ‘first of many returns’ just where we expect the bare terrain to be. However, there are not so many that the results can be expected to drastically change by including them into the ground finding process.

Smooth DTM from Drone LiDAR off Velodyne HDL 32A mounted on DJI M600 UAV

Recently we attempted to do a small LiDAR survey by drone for a pet project of our CEO in our “code and surf camp” here in Samara, Costa Rica. But surveying is difficult when you are a novice and we ran into a trajectory issue. The dramatic “wobbles” were entirely our fault, but fortunately our mistakes also led to something useful: We found some LAS export bugs. Our laser scanner was a Velodyne HDL-32E integrated with a NovAtel INS into the Snoopy Series A HD made by LiDARUSA. The system was carried by a DJI Matrice 600 (M600) drone. We processed the trajectory with NovAtel Inertial Explorer (here we made the “wobbles” error) and finally exported the LAS and LAZ files with ScanLook PC (version 1.0.182) from LiDARUSA.

While we were investigating our “wobbles” (which clearly were our mistake) we also found five different LAS export bugs in ScanLook PC that seem to have started sometime after version 1.0.171 and will likely end with version 1.0.193. Below an illustration of a correct export from version 1.0.129 and a buggy export from version 1.0.182. In both instances you see the returns from one revolution of the Velodyne HDL-32E scanner head ordered by their GPS time stamps and colored to distinguish the 32 separate beams. In the buggy version, groups of around seven non-adjacent returns are given the same time stamp. This bug will only affect you, if correct GPS time stamps are important for your subsequent LiDAR processing or if your client explicitly asked for ASPRS specification compliant LAS files. We plan to publish another blog post detailing how to find this GPS time stamping bug (and the other four bugs we found).

During the many interactions we had working through “wobbles” and export bugs, we obtained a nice set of six flight lines from Seth Gulich of Bowman Consulting – a US American company based in Stuart, Florida – who flew an identical “Snoopy Series A HD” system also on a DJI Matrice 600 drone at approximately 100 feet above ground level above a model airplane airport in Palm Beach, Florida. You can download the data set here. In the following we will check the flight line alignment of this data set and then process it into a smooth DTM. All command lines used are summarized in this text file.

First we generate a lasinfo report that includes a number of histograms for on-the-fly merged flight lines with lasinfo and then use the z coordinate histogram from the lasinfo report to set reasonable min/max values for the elevation color ramp of lasview:

lasinfo -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz -merged ^
        -cd ^
        -histo z 1 ^
        -histo user_data 1 ^
        -histo point_source 1 ^
        -o 1_quality\Velodyne_merged_info.txt

lasview -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
        -points 10000000 ^
        -set_min_max 25 75

The lasinfo report shows no information about the coordinate reference system. We found out experimentally that the horizontal coordinates seem to be EPSG code 2236 and that the vertical units are most likely be US survey feet. The warnings you will see in the lasinfo report have to do with the fact that the double-precision bounding box stored in the LAS header was populated with numbers that have many more decimal digits than the coordinates in the file, which only have millifeet resolution as all three scale factors are 0.001 (meaning coordinates have three decimal digits). The information which of the 32 lasers was collecting which point is stored in both the ‘user data’ and the ‘point source ID’ field which is evident from the histograms in the lasinfo report. We need to be careful not to override both fields in later processing.

Next we use lasoverlap to check how well the LiDAR points from the flight out and the flight back align vertically. This tool computes the difference of the lowest points for each square foot covered by multiple flight lines. Differences of less than a quarter of a foot are both times mapped to white, differences of more than one foot (more than half a foot) are mapped to saturated red or blue depending on whether the difference is positive or negative in the first run (in the second run):

lasoverlap -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
           -faf ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 1.00 -step 1 ^
           -odir 1_quality -o overlap_025_100.png

lasoverlap -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
           -faf ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 0.50 -step 1 ^
           -odir 1_quality -o overlap_025_050.png

We use a new feature of the LAStools GUI (as of version 180429) to closer inspect large red or blue areas. With lasmerge we clip out regions that looks suspect for closer examination with lasview. First we spatially index the flight lines to make this process faster. With the ‘-gui’ switch we start the tool in GUI mode with flight lines already loaded. Using the new PNG overlay roll-out on the left we add the ‘overlap_025_050_diff.png’ image from the quality folder created in the last step and clip out three areas.

lasindex -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz
         -tile_size 10 -maximum -100 ^
         -cores 3

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz -gui

You can also clip out these three areas using the command lines below:

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside_tile 939500 889860 100 ^
         -o 1_quality\939500_889860.laz

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside_tile 940400 889620 100 ^
         -o 1_quality\940400_889620.laz

lasmerge -i 0_strips_raw\Velodyne*.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside_tile 940500 890180 100 ^
         -o 1_quality\940500_890180.laz

The reader may inspect the areas 939500_889860.laz, 940400_889620.laz, and 940500_890180.laz with lasview using profile views via hot keys ‘x’ and switching back and forth between the points from different flight lines via hot keys ‘0’, ‘1’, ‘2’, ‘3’, … for individual and ‘a’ for all flight lines as we have done it in previous tutorials [1,2,3]. Using drop-lines or rise-lines via the pop-up menu gives you a sense of scale. Removing points with lastrack that are horizontally too far from the trajectory could be one strategy to use fewer outliers. But as our surfaces are expected to be “fluffy” (because we have a Velodyne LiDAR system), we accept these flight line differences and continue processing.

Here the complete LAStools processing pipeline for creating an average ground model from the set of six flight lines that results in the hillshaded DTM shown below. The workflow is similar to those we have developed in earlier blog posts for Velodyne Puck based systems like the Hovermap and the Yellowscan and in the other Snoopy tutorial. All command lines used are summarized in this text file.

Hillshaded DTM with half foot resolution generated via average ground computation with LAStools.

In the first step we lastile the six flight lines into 250 by 250 feet tiles with 25 feet buffer while preserving flight line information. The flight line information will be stored in the “point source ID” field of each point and therefore override the beam ID that is currently stored there. But the beam ID is also stored in the “user data” field as the  lasinfo report had told us. We set all classifications to zero and add information about the horizontal coordinate reference system EPSG code 2236 and the vertical units (US Survey Feet).

lastile -i 0_strips_raw\*.laz ^
        -faf ^
        -set_classification 0 ^
        -epsg 2236 -elevation_survey_feet ^
        -tile_size 250 -buffer 25 -flag_as_withheld ^
        -odir 2_tiles_raw -o pb.laz

On three cores in parallel we then lassort the points in the tiles into a space-filling curve order which will accelerate later operations.

lassort -i 2_tiles_raw\*.laz ^
        -odir 2_tiles_sorted -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Next we use lasthin to classify the point whose elevation is closest to the 5th elevation percentile among all points falling into its cell with classification code 8. We run lasthin multiple times and each time increase the cell size from 1, 2, 4, 8 to 16 foot. We do this because we have requested the 5th elevation percentile to only be computed when there are at least 20 points in the cell. Percentiles are statistical measures and need a reasonable sample size to be stable. Because drone flights are very dense in the center and more sparse at the edges this increase in cell size assures that we have a good selection of points classified with classification code 8 across the entire survey area.

lasthin -i 2_tiles_sorted\*.laz ^
        -step 1 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step01 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step01\*.laz ^
        -step 2 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step02 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step02\*.laz ^
        -step 4 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step04 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step04\*.laz ^
        -step 8 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step08 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

lasthin -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step08\*.laz ^
        -step 16 -percentile 5 20 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step16 -olaz ^
        -cores 3

Then we let lasground_new run on only the points classified with classification code 8 (i.e. by ignoring the points still classified with code 0) which classifies them into ground (code 2) and non-ground (code 1).

lasground_new -i 3_tiles_thinned_p05_step16\*.laz ^
              -ignore_class 0 ^
              -town ^
              -odir 4_tiles_ground_low -olaz ^
              -cores 3

The ground points we have computed form somewhat of a lower envelope of the “fluffy” points of a Velodyne scanner. With lasheight we now draw all the points near the ground – namely those from 0.1 foot below to 0.4 foot above the ground – into a new classification code 6 that we term “thick ground”. The ‘-do_not_store_in_user_data’ switch prevent the default behavior of lasheight from happening, which would override the beam ID information that it stored in the ‘user data’ field with approximate height value.

lasheight -i 4_tiles_ground_low\*.laz ^
          -classify_between -0.1 0.4 6 ^
          -do_not_store_in_user_data ^
          -odir 4_tiles_ground_thick -olaz ^
          -cores 3

A few close-up shots of the resulting “thick ground” are shown in the picture gallery below.

We then use lasgrid to average the (orange) thick ground points onto a regular grid with a cell spacing of half a foot. We do not grid the tile buffers by adding the ‘-use_tile_bb’ switch.

lasgrid -i 4_tiles_ground_thick\*.laz ^
        -keep_class 6 ^
        -step 0.5 -average ^
        -use_tile_bb ^
        -odir 5_tiles_gridded_mean_ground -olaz &
        -cores 3

Finally we use blast2dem to merge all the averaged ground point grids into one file, interpolate across open areas without ground points, and compute the hillshaded DTM shown above. All command lines used are summarized in this text file.

blast2dem -i 5_tiles_gridded_mean_ground\*.laz ^
          -merged ^
          -step 0.5 ^
          -hillshade ^
          -o dtm.png

We thank Seth Gulich of Bowman Consulting for sharing this LiDAR data set with us. It was flown with a DJI Matrice 600 drone carrying a “Snoopy A series HD” LiDAR system from LidarUSA.

New Step-by-Step Tutorial for Velodyne Drone LiDAR from Snoopy by LidarUSA

The folks from Harris Aerial gave us LiDAR data from a test-flight of one of their drones, the Carrier H4 Hybrid HE (with a 5kg maximum payload and a retail price of US$ 28,000), carrying a Snoopy A series LiDAR system from LidarUSA in the countryside near Huntsville, Alabama. The laser scanner used by the Snoopy A series is a Velodyne HDL 32E that has 32 different laser/detector pairs that fire in succession to scan up to 700,000 points per second within a range of 1 to 70 meters. You can download the raw LiDAR file from the 80 second test flight here. As always, the first thing we do is to visualize the file with lasview and to generate a textual report of its contents with lasinfo.

lasview -i Velodyne001.laz -set_min_max 680 750

It becomes obvious that the drone must have scanned parts of itself (probably the landing gear) during the flight and we exploit this fact in the later processing. The information which of the 32 lasers was collecting which point is stored into the ‘point source ID’ field which is usually used for the flightline information. This results in a psychedelic look in lasview as those 32 different numbers get mapped to the 8 different colors that lasview uses for distinguishing flightlines.

The lasinfo report we generate computes the average point density with ‘-cd’ and includes histograms for a number of point attributes, namely for ‘user data’, ‘intensity’, ‘point source ID’, ‘GPS time’, and ‘scan angle rank’.

lasinfo -i Velodyne001.laz ^
        -cd ^
        -histo user_data 1 ^
        -histo point_source 1 ^
        -histo intensity 16 ^
        -histo gps_time 1 ^
        -histo scan_angle_rank 5 ^
        -odir quality -odix _info -otxt

You can download the resulting report here and it will tell you that the information which of the 32 lasers was collecting which point was stored both into the ‘user data’ field and into the ‘point source ID’ field. The warnings you see below have to do with the fact that the double-precision bounding box stored in the LAS header was populated with numbers that have many more decimal digits than the coordinates in the file, which only have millimeter (or millifeet) resolution as all three scale factors are 0.001 (meaning three decimal digits).

WARNING: stored resolution of min_x not compatible with x_offset and x_scale_factor: 2171988.6475160527
WARNING: stored resolution of min_y not compatible with y_offset and y_scale_factor: 1622812.606925504
WARNING: stored resolution of min_z not compatible with z_offset and z_scale_factor: 666.63504345017589
WARNING: stored resolution of max_x not compatible with x_offset and x_scale_factor: 2172938.973065129
WARNING: stored resolution of max_y not compatible with y_offset and y_scale_factor: 1623607.5209975131
WARNING: stored resolution of max_z not compatible with z_offset and z_scale_factor: 1053.092674726669

Both the “return number” and the “number of returns” attribute of every points in the file is 2. This makes it appear as if the file would only contain the last returns of those laser shots that produced two returns. However, as the Velodyne HDL 32E only produces one return per shot we can safely conclude that those numbers should all be 1 instead of 2 and that this is just a small bug in the export software. We can easily fix this with las2las.

reporting minimum and maximum for all LAS point record entries ...
[...]
 return_number 2 2
 number_of_returns 2 2
[...]

The lasinfo report lacks information about the coordinate reference system as there is no VLR that stores projection information. Harris Aerial could not help us other than telling us that the scan was near Huntsville, Alamaba. Measuring certain distances in the scene like the height of the house or the tree suggests that both horizontal and vertical units are in feet, or rather in US survey feet. After some experimenting we find that using EPSG 26930 for NAD83 Alabama West but forcing the default horizontal units from meters to US survey feet gives a result that aligns well with high-resolution Google Earth imagery as you can see below:

lasgrid -i flightline1.laz ^
        -i flightline2.laz ^
        -merged ^
        -epsg 26930 -survey_feet ^
        -step 1 -highest ^
        -false -set_min_max 680 750 ^
        -o testing26930usft.png

Using EPSG code 26930 but with US survey feet instead of meters results in nice alignment with GE imagery.

We use the fact that the drone has scanned itself to extract an (approximate) trajectory by isolating those LiDAR returns that have hit the drone. Via a visual check with lasview (by hovering with the cursor over the lowest drone hits and pressing hotkey ‘i’) we determine that the lowest drone hits are all above 719 feet. We use two calls to las2las to split the point cloud vertically. In the same call we also change the resolution from three to two decimal digits, fix the return number issue, and add the missing geo-referencing information:

las2las -i Velodyne001.laz ^
        -rescale 0.01 0.01 0.01 ^
        -epsg 26930 -survey_feet -elevation_survey_feet ^
        -set_return_number 1 ^
        -set_number_of_returns 1 ^
        -keep_z_above 719 ^
        -odix _above719 -olaz

las2las -i Velodyne001.laz ^
        -rescale 0.01 0.01 0.01 ^
        -epsg 26930 -survey_feet -elevation_survey_feet ^
        -set_return_number 1 ^
        -set_number_of_returns 1 ^
        -keep_z_below 719 ^
        -odix _below719 -olaz

We then use the manual editing capabilities of lasview to change the classifications of the LiDAR points that correspond to drone hits from 1 to 12, which is illustrated by the series of screen shots below.

lasview -i Velodyne001_above719.laz

The workflow illustrated above results in a tiny LAY file that is part of the LASlayers functionality of LAStools. It only encodes the few changes in classifications that we’ve made to the LAZ file without re-writing those parts that have not changed. Those interested may use laslayers to inspect the structure of the LAY file:

laslayers -i Velodyne001_above719.laz

We can apply the LAY file on-the-fly with the ‘-ilay’ option, for example, when running lasview:

lasview -i Velodyne001_above719.laz -ilay

To separate the drone-hit trajectory from the remaining points we run lassplit with the ‘-ilay’ option and request to split by classification with this command line:

lassplit -i Velodyne001_above719.laz -ilay ^
         -by_classification -digits 3 ^
         -olaz

This gives us two new files with the three-digit appendices ‘_001’ and ‘_012’. The latter one contains those points we marked as being part of the trajectory. We now want to use lasview to – visually – find a good moment in time where to split the trajectory into multiple flightlines. The lasinfo report tells us that the GPS time stamps are in the range from 418,519 to 418,602. In order to use the same trick as we did in our recent article on processing LiDAR data from the Hovermap Drone, where we mapped the GPS time to the intensity for querying it via lasview, we first need to subtract a large number from the GPS time stamps to bring them into a suitable range that fits the intensity field as done here.

lasview -i Velodyne001_above719_012.laz ^
        -translate_gps_time -418000 ^
        -bin_gps_time_into_intensity 1
        -steps 5000

The ‘-steps 5000’ argument makes for a slower playback (press ‘p’ to repeat) to better follow the trajectory.

Hovering with the mouse over a point that – visually – seems to be one of the turning points of the drone and pressing ‘i’ on the keyboard shows an intensity value of 548 which corresponds to the GPS time stamp 418548, which we then use to split the LiDAR point cloud (without the trajectory) into two flightlines:

las2las -i Velodyne001_below719.laz ^
        -i Velodyne001_above719_001.laz ^
        -merged ^
        -keep_gps_time_below 418548 ^
        -o flightline1.laz

las2las -i Velodyne001_below719.laz ^
        -i Velodyne001_above719_001.laz ^
        -merged ^
        -keep_gps_time_above 418548 ^
        -o flightline2.laz

Next we use lasoverlap to check how well the LiDAR points from the flight out and the flight back align vertically. This tool computes the difference of the lowest points for each square foot covered by both flightlines. Differences of less than a quarter of a foot are mapped to white, differences of more than half a foot are mapped to saturated red or blue depending on whether the difference is positive or negative:

lasoverlap -i flightline1.laz ^
           -i flightline2.laz ^
           -faf ^
           -min_diff 0.25 -max_diff 0.50 -step 1 ^
           -odir quality -o overlap_025_050.png

We then use a new feature of the LAStools GUI (as of version 180429) to closer inspect larger red or blue areas. We want to use lasmerge and clip out any region that looks suspect for closer examination with lasview. We start the tool in the GUI mode with the ‘-gui’ command and the two flightlines pre-loaded. Using the new PNG overlay roll-out on the left we add the ‘overlap_025_050_diff.png’ image from the quality folder created in the last step and clip out three areas.

lasmerge -i flightline1.laz -i flightline2.laz -gui

You can also clip out these three areas using the command lines below:

lasmerge -i flightline1.laz -i flightline2.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside 2172500 1623160 2172600 1623165 ^
         -o clip2500_3160_100x005.laz

lasmerge -i flightline1.laz -i flightline2.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside 2172450 1623450 2172550 1623455 ^
         -o clip2450_3450_100x005.laz

lasmerge -i flightline1.laz -i flightline2.laz ^
         -faf ^
         -inside 2172430 1623290 2172530 1623310 ^
         -o clip2430_3290_100x020.laz

A closer inspection of the three cut out slices explains the red and blue areas in the difference image created by lasoverlap. We find a small systematic error in two of the slices. In slice ‘clip2500_3160_100x005.laz‘ the green points from flightline 1 are on average slightly higher than the red points from flightline 2. Vice-versa in slice ‘clip2450_3450_100x005.laz‘ the green points from flightline 1 are on average slightly lower than the red points from flightline 2. However, the error is less than half a foot and only happens near the edges of the flightlines. Given that our surfaces are expected to be “fluffy” anyways (as is typical for Velodyne LiDAR systems), we accept these differences and continue processing.

The strong red and blue colors in the center of the difference image created by lasoverlap is easily explained by looking at slice ‘clip2430_3290_100x020.laz‘. The scanner was “looking” under a gazebo-like open roof structure from two different directions and therefore always seeing parts of the floor in one flightline that were obscured by the roof in the other.

While working with this data we’ve also implemented a new feature for lastrack that computes the 3D distance between LiDAR points and the trajectory and allows storing the result as an additional per point attribute with extra bytes. Those can then be visualized with lasgrid. Here an example:

lastrack -i flightline1.laz ^
         -i flightline2.laz ^
         -track Velodyne001_above719_012.laz ^
         -store_xyz_range_as_extra_bytes ^
         -odix _xyz_range -olaz ^
         =cores 2

lasgrid -i flightline*_xyz_range.laz -merged ^
        -drop_attribute_below 0 1 ^
        -attribute0 -lowest ^
        -false -set_min_max 20 200 ^
        -o quality/closest_xyz_range_020ft_200ft.png

lasgrid -i flightline*_xyz_range.laz -merged ^
        -drop_attribute_below 0 1 ^
        -attribute0 -highest ^
        -false -set_min_max 30 300 ^
        -o quality/farthest_xyz_range_030ft_300ft.png

Below the complete processing pipeline for creating a median ground model from the “fluffy” Velodyne LiDAR data that results in the hillshaded DTM shown here. The workflow is similar to those we have developed in earlier blog posts for Velodyne Puck based systems like the Hovermap and the Yellowscan.

Hillshaded DTM with a resolution of 1 foot generated via a median ground computation by the LAStools processing pipeline detailed below.

lastile -i flightline1.laz ^
        -i flightline2.laz ^
        -faf ^
        -tile_size 250 -buffer 25 -flag_as_withheld ^
        -odir tiles_raw -o somer.laz

lasnoise -i tiles_raw\*.laz ^
         -step_xy 2 -step 1 -isolated 9 ^
         -odir tiles_denoised -olaz ^
          -cores 4

lasthin -i tiles_denoised\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 7 ^
        -step 1 -percentile 0.05 10 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir tiles_thinned_1_foot -olaz ^
        -cores 4

lasthin -i tiles_thinned_1_foot\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 7 ^
        -step 2 -percentile 0.05 10 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir tiles_thinned_2_foot -olaz ^
        -cores 4

lasthin -i tiles_thinned_2_foot\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 7 ^
        -step 4 -percentile 0.05 10 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir tiles_thinned_4_foot -olaz ^
        -cores 4

lasthin -i tiles_thinned_4_foot\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 7 ^
        -step 8 -percentile 0.05 10 -classify_as 8 ^
        -odir tiles_thinned_8_foot -olaz ^
        -cores 4

lasground -i tiles_thinned_8_foot\*.laz ^
          -ignore_class 1 7 ^
          -town -extra_fine ^
          -odir tiles_ground_lowest -olaz ^
          -cores 4

lasheight -i tiles_ground_lowest\*.laz ^
          -classify_between -0.05 0.5 6 ^
          -odir tiles_ground_thick -olaz ^
          -cores 4

lasthin -i tiles_ground_thick\*.laz ^
        -ignore_class 1 7 ^
        -step 1 -percentile 0.5 -classify_as 2 ^
        -odir tiles_ground_median -olaz ^
        -cores 4

las2dem -i tiles_ground_median\*.laz ^
        -keep_class 2 ^
        -step 1 -use_tile_bb ^
        -odir tiles_dtm -obil ^
        -cores 4

blast2dem -i tiles_dtm\*.bil -merged ^
          -step 1 -hillshade ^
          -o dtm_hillshaded.png

We thank Harris Aerial for sharing this LiDAR data set with us flown by their Carrier H4 Hybrid HE drone carrying a Snoopy A series LiDAR system from LidarUSA.